For any greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement project activity, the GHG emission reductions have to be certified by a qualified and credible carbon standard. Certification organizations like the ones listed below provide methodologies that define how GHG reductions should be calculated in order to be recognized under their carbon standard. These methodologies provide step-by-step guidance on how to establish the baseline scenario, calculation of GHG emission reductions, and monitor the project.

Examples of approved methodologies, which can be used for improved cookstove projects include:

Clean Development Mechanism methodologies:

  • AMS-I.C.: Thermal energy production with or without electricity – For projects involving renewable energy technologies that supply users with thermal energy that displaces fossil fuel use. Examples of these in the context of improved cookstoves include, but are not limited to solar thermal water heaters and dryers, solar cookers, energy derived from renewable biomass. As of July 2013, a total of 105 successfully registered clean cookstove carbon projects from developing countries have applied this methodology, making it the most commonly used carbon methodology globally.
  • AMS-II.G.: Energy efficiency measures in thermal applications of non-renewable biomass – For project activities that propose the introduction of more efficient devices using non-renewable biomass or the modernization of existing devices that reduces use of non-renewable biomass for combustion. Examples of these in the context of improved cookstoves include, but are not limited to replacement of existing biomass fired cookstoves or ovens or dryers with more efficient devices. As of July 2013, a total of 48 successfully registered clean cookstove carbon projects from developing countries have applied this methodology, making it another commonly used carbon methodology globally.
  • AMS-I.E.: Switch from non-renewable biomass for thermal applications by the user – For project activities that reduce the use of non-renewable biomass by introducing renewable energy technologies. Examples of these in the context of improved cookstoves include, but are not limited, to biogas cookstoves, solar cookers, and water boiling using renewable biomass. As of July 2013, 17 successfully registered clean cookstove carbon projects from developing countries have applied this methodology.
  • AMS-I.I.: Biogas/biomass thermal applications for households/small users – For project activities that allow the generation of renewable thermal energy using renewable biomass or biogas for use in residential, commercial, institutional installations (like for supply to households, small farms or for use in built environment of institutions such as schools). Examples of these technologies that reduce or avoid fossil fuel use in the context of improved cookstoves include, but are not limited to biogas cookstoves, biomass briquette cookstoves, small scale baking and drying systems, water heating, or space heating systems. As of July 2013, only 2 successfully registered clean cookstove carbon projects from developing countries have applied this methodology.
  • AMS-I.K.: Solar cookers for households – For projects introducing solar cookers to individual households to be used for household cooking purpose (like meal preparation, water heating and baking for household consumption). The use of the solar energy for cooking will reduce or displace the use of the existing traditional cookstove(s) and displace the consumption of fossil fuels (example Kerosene or LPG) or non-renewable biomass. As of July 2013, none of the successfully registered clean cookstove carbon projects from developing countries have applied this methodology.
  • AMS-III.BG.: Emission reduction through sustainable charcoal production and consumption – For project activities introducing new and efficient charcoal production technologies using renewable biomass, displacing the production of charcoal in unimproved traditional kilns that use non-renewable biomass. The sustainable charcoal is supplied to consumers (e.g. households, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs)) within the project boundary, which will result in GHG emission reductions. Examples in the context of improved cookstoves include using sustainable charcoal in energy efficient clean cookstoves. As of December 2013, no registered clean cookstove project has applied this methodology under any carbon standard.

Gold Standard methodologies:

  • Simplified Methodology for Efficient Cookstoves – For micro scale programmes and micro scale activities (generating GHG emission reductions less than 10,000 tCO2e/year) that introduce new fuel wood burning cookstoves to reduce the use of non-renewable fuel wood or switch from non renewable to renewable fuel wood to meet household cooking needs. As of July 2013, up to 17 successfully registered clean cookstove GS projects from developing countries have applied this methodology. It is the most commonly used GS voluntary methodology.
  • Indicative programme, baseline, and monitoring methodology for Small Scale Biodigester – For programmes of activities involving the implementation of biodigesters in households for replacement of consumption of fossil fuel and/or biomass with biogas, by a project coordinator who acts as the project participant. It is directly applicable in the context of clean cookstoves. As of July 2013, 9 successfully registered clean cookstove GS projects from developing countries have applied this methodology.
  • Technologies and practices to displace decentralized thermal energy consumption – For programs or project activities introducing technologies and/or practices that reduce or displace greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the thermal energy consumption of households and non-domestic installations. Examples of these technologies include the introduction of advanced biomass or fossil fuel cookstoves, ovens, dryers, space and water heaters (solar and otherwise), heat retention cookers, solar cookers, bio-digesters, safe water supply and treatment technologies that displace water boiling, thermal insulation in cold climates, etc. As of July 2013, 7 successfully registered clean cookstove GS projects from developing countries have applied this methodology.
  • Thermal energy from plant oil for the user of cookstoves – For project activities that use of various plant oils (like physic nut oil, coconut oil, palm oil) within stoves for cooking and water heating, in households or small enterprises like restaurants or breweries. As of July 2013, no registered clean cookstove GS project has applied this methodology.